The Scotsman reports today that the SNP government’s botched reform of policing has seen pressure on contact centre staff rocket.

Today’s major review into call handling by HM Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland revealed a string of problems in contact centre operations at Police Scotland, including staff feeling under pressure to end calls quickly and using scribble pads to take details of cases.

Last week Scottish Labour Justice Spokesperson Graeme Pearson launched the Pearson Review of policing in Scotland, which outlined a range of recommendations to increase local accountability.

Commenting on the report, Scottish Labour Justice Spokesperson Graeme Pearson, a former senior police officer, said:

“The Scottish public must have confidence that when they need the police they will be there and they will keep our communities safe.

This damning report confirms the complete and utter botched job the SNP have made of reforming policing in Scotland.

The challenge now for SNP Justice Minister Michael Matheson  is to fully disclose the problems in our policing service and for him to ensure that the SPA will get a grip.

The report reveals a range of problems with IT systems and training, staff having to use scribble pads when dealing with calls and feeling under pressure to end calls quickly.

When the M9 tragedy occurred, Michael Matheson said that it had nothing to do with a lack of capacity, a lack of resources, or staff feeling overburdened.

We now know that to be completely false. He now owes an apology to police staff who have been left to take the blame by the SNP Government, the SPA and senior officers.

“The report finds that whilst savings of £1.8 million on policing have been made, the force had to spend £1.4 million on overtime.

Over the course of this parliament we have seen an SPA chair go, a Justice Secretary go and a Chief Constable go.

It is time for Michael Matheson to acknowledge the huge failings made in reforming Police Scotland on his watch, and get on with fixing them.

The SNP Government should spend more time explaining itself and less time congratulating itself.”