Ian Murray has launched his deputy leadership campaign with a stark warning that Labour must become a party for the entire UK. He said the party must care about every single region and nation, listening to voters in seats the party won, seats it lost, and seats it will never win.

If elected as deputy leader, Mr Murray will take responsibility for the party’s approach to how the UK should be governed in a post-Brexit Britain so that no city, town or community is left behind. He will present a report to the party’s September conference on how Labour can win again.

As well as setting out a vision for the country, he said the party must also address its own organisation, including its complaints procedure. If elected, Mr Murray will demand all outstanding complaints are placed on his desk on the Monday morning, and he will adopt a zero-tolerance approach to antisemitism and all forms of racism, taking personal responsibility for the party’s approach.

At today’s campaign launch at the Wester Hailes school he attended as a child, Scotland’s only Labour MP said:

“We must reach out and listen to every corner of this country and every person in our country. Our party can only win by winning support across the whole of the United Kingdom, by building a coalition of all types of people with a variety of interests.

Let me be clear: I’ve never seen politics as an exercise in carving up different parts of the country, or different interest groups. Central to winning is building broad coalitions of people with different and varied interests.

The Labour Party must care about every single region and nation of this United Kingdom, and I will take responsibility for the party’s approach to how the UK should be governed in a post-Brexit Britain – so that no city, town or community is left behind.”

Mr Murray added:

“I’m embarrassed about the cancer of antisemitism in our party. As deputy leader I will ensure a zero-tolerance approach to bullying, harassment and antisemitism.

I will take personal responsibility for the grievance and complaints process, and I will be held responsible for enforcing that zero-tolerance approach.

Never again do I want any Jewish person to feel that they do not have a home in the Labour Party, that they can’t trust us to do the right thing, or that they feel our party would make the country a more dangerous place for them.

The Labour Party – that stood alongside Jewish people for generations – strayed from our historic values. And in many of the big fights over the past few years, the same has been true.

We should be proud of what the last Labour government achieved in power, and we must now look to the future and stand up for what we believe in – co-operation, solidarity, and working together.”